BREAKING: America Finally Takes Steps To Ban Semi-Automatic Weapons

It has been nearly impossible for Democrats to get any gun legislation passed in Congress, even following horrific attacks in Newtown, Aurora, and the Pulse nightclub shooting. Well, a Massachusetts lawmaker has decided enough is enough.

Maura Healy, the attorney general for the state of Massachusetts has decided it’s time to make some changes at the state level. Healy said, “Here in Massachusetts, 10,000 assault weapons were sold just in the last year- each one nearly identical to the rifle used to gun down 49 innocent people in Orlando. In the week after the Pulse nightclub massacre, sales of weapons strikingly similar to the Sig Sauer MCX used at Pulse jumped as high as 450 % over the previous week- just in Massachusetts”

Healy continues:

“The Massachusetts assault weapons ban mirrors the federal ban Congress allowed to expire in 2004. It prohibits the sale of specific weapons like the Colt AR-15 and AK-47 and explicitly bans “copies or duplicates” of those weapons. But gun manufacturers have taken it upon themselves to define what a “copy” or “duplicate” weapon is. They market “state compliant” copycat versions of their assault weapons to Massachusetts buyers. They sell guns without a flash suppressor or folding or telescoping stock, for example, small tweaks that do nothing to limit the lethalness of the weapon.”

Under the new law, the following rules would apply:

“No person shall sell, offer for sale, transfer or possess an assault weapon or a large capacity feeding device that was not otherwise lawfully possessed on September 13, 1994. Whoever not being licensed under the provisions of section 122 violates the provisions of this section shall be punished, for a first offense, by a fine of not less than $1,000 nor more than $10,000 or by imprisonment for not less than one year nor more than ten years, or by both such fine and imprisonment, and for a second offense, by a fine of not less than $5,000 nor more than $15,000 or by imprisonment for not less than five years nor more than 15 years, or by both such fine and imprisonment. The provisions of this section shall not apply to: (i) the possession by a law enforcement officer for purposes of law enforcement; or (ii) the possession by an individual who is retired from service with a law enforcement agency and is not otherwise prohibited from receiving such a weapon or feeding device from such agency upon retirement.”

It would be fantastic to see such a law passed, and hopefully other states would follow in Massachusetts footsteps.

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