BRAVO! Jim Carrey Defends Kathy Griffin: Comedians ‘Are The Last Line of Defense’

Kathy Griffin may have recently been demoted from the D-list she happily inhabited, to castaway from Hollywood altogether, but she did accomplish something that no one else has been able to do: uniting both sides of the political aisle against a common enemy. Herself.

Condemnation of Griffin’s photoshoot depicting the decapitated, bloody head of Trump came quickly and from everyone, regardless of their political allegiance. Even fellow comedian and friend Sen. Al Franken and bestie Anderson Cooper spoke out against her stunt.

But not everyone sees Griffin’s actions as utterly indefensible. Jim Carrey, in an interview on the red carpet with Entertainment Tonight at the premiere of the show he is producing called I’m Dying Up Here, defended Griffin.

When questioned as to when, as a comedian, does he feel like crossed that line, he responded:

It is the job of the comedian to cross that line at all times, because that line is not real. And if you step out into to spotlight and you do the crazy things that [Trump’s] doing, we’re the last line of defense and comedians are the last voice of truth in this whole thing.

Carrey continued by describing a dream he had:

I was playing golf with Donald Trump and I was standing beside him with a club in my hand, considering my options when I suddenly woke up. It was one of those dreams where you want to get back to sleep so you can finish it.

Cue the public outcry over Jim Carrey’s unconscious desires.
And Carrey is not the only person who is defending Kathy Griffin. Comedian and Inside Amy Schumer writer Mike Lawrence posted on Facebook, urging Griffin to own her provocation and even up the ante in the future:

And there’s more. In a Time.com piece titled “Why Kathy Griffin Has the Right to Grotesquely Mock Donald Trump,” writer Jenna Ellis argues that the framers of our constitution created the unalienable right of freedom of speech so that citizens can keep the government in check, and that because Griffin did not threaten the President nor did she encourage others towards violence, her action is well within the limitations of freedom of speech. And an article on Vox, “Kathy Griffin, political protest art, and the backlash over ‘beheading’ Donald Trump,” claimed that Griffin was actually joining “centuries of women artists who symbolically beheaded powerful men,” and made reference to Game of Thrones depicting prosthetic model President George W. Bush’s head impaled on a pike in the background of a scene, and Glenn Beck submerging a bobblehead of President Barack Obama in urine.